X-MEN ORIGINS: WOLVERINE
Music composed by Harry Gregson-Williams
Label: Varèse Sarabande
Catalog:
302 066 967 2

Year: 2009
Tracks:

1. Logan Through Time
2. Special Privileges
3. Lagos, Nigeria
4. Wade Goes To Work
5. Kayla
6. Victor Visits
7. Adamantium
8. Agent Zero Comes For Logan
9. Logan Meets Gambit
10. To The Island
11. Deadpool
12. The Towers Collapse
13. Memories Lost
“…I’ll Find My Own Way”


Total Time: 45:34
Rating:


Reviewed by
Tom Hoover

 
In what has become a long string of composers to write music for the X-Men franchise/spin offs, Harry Gregson-Williams steps up next with his music for, Wolverine. Ironically, Harry follows his former writing partner, John Powell, in the footsteps of this franchise, with Powell having scored X-Men 3. Though Wolverine is not a linear sequel to the X-Men portfolio, I do consider all the films to be part of one film franchise with this origin story providing the background of its most popular character. The soundtrack was released a few days after the film debuted and provides 45 minutes of Harry's score.

Okay, so the main theme for Wolverine is a nice, rugged representation of the character. Beyond that, unfortunately, there really isn't anything unique or terribly interesting about Harry's score. It seems that the studios are content with a safe, predictable approach when it comes to scoring these types of superhero pictures and that trend doesn't appear like it will change any time soon. Wolverine is just another example of the modern soundtrack simply fitting into a formula.

When I look at the crop of movies that are being released today, I can only imagine just how awesome it would be to have some of the veteran composers take a shot at this material. With Wolverine, there isn't any excitement generate by its music. Theme aside, the background and action music could have been derived from any recent feature film score. There really isn't a memorable signature etched here.

The soundtrack begins with the debut of Wolverine's theme, which is solid and just "tough" enough to get the job done. It's a theme I wish that Harry could have built on because it really is a good foundation for the score, particularly when it is first heard in the opening title sequence. It was actually quite an exciting blend of visuals and music in this opening sequence. When the typical action music arrives, however, that is when the score becomes just another job, seemingly. There isn't any innovation or crafty variations of the theme to make the bulk of this material stand the test of being played on its own. It should also be noted that the album concludes meekly as the main theme builds to an apex and then simply whimpers off.

With Prince Caspian proving to be a bit of a disappointment, and now Wolverine, I am just hoping Harry gets back to writing music that upholds the promise of his work on a Sinbad or Kingdom of Heaven. Until then, we have to make do with Wolverine, a functional score that lacks the attitude of its main character. A score that most soundtrack fans can probably do without. It's missing ingenuity and strength, two components that no super hero can do without!

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